Posts tagged obesity

Time Flies And You Are the Pilot

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time flies Thanksgiving has come and gone — I still can’t believe December is here. I love holidays but I also love getting back into the swing of life.  I’m excited about what’s happening in my life — new career opportunities and new paths to follow. I am testing out the theory about letting go and letting life take you where it’s supposed to without fear of what’s next. And everything little thing, will be alright.  This is new for me but I am committed to trying it this way – worrying and stressing myself out hasn’t really helped before. And so far, new opportunities have appeared from the least likely spots.

I started creating my consulting website: LiftPotential.com. It’s very much a work in progress but I’m excited to see it evolve. Check it out when you get a chance and if you do have any marketing needs focused around social media or integrating social with traditional marketing, let me know!

I didn’t go to workout as usual on Saturday –instead spent it with the family at Mount Vernon. Nothing replaces some good old fashioned time with the family. Scott’s family was in town from Southern Cali, so we met his Aunt and Uncle along with his cousin and her daughter and walked the grounds. I love Mount Vernon — I’ve probably been there 4+ times now and never get tired of it. I love to think about how Washington and his family spent their time there –and we were lucky enough to get to see the third floor on this visit, which is only open one month a year.  The room where Mr Washington died is up there.  Just a pretty cool day overall…

I have mentioned before, that many people ask me how I manage to stay so inspired and motivated to continue being fit. A lot of it is finding what works for you and being passionate about it. CrossFit and being overall fit has definitely helped me explore a new path in my life – but a huge driving motivator for me are my kiddos.

Your actions and decisions lay the foundation for their lifelong health – and I know how hard it is to start when you are already an adult. My goal is to have being healthy and fit be a normal part of their every day life just like it’s mine now. They won’t know any different – Read this article below and hopefully it will help you get moving the next time you start to slide and lose motivation.

10 Things I Want My Daughter to Know About Working Out  - “Exercise is a lifestyle, not an event. Being an active person isn’t about taking a class three times a week at the gym. It’s about things like biking to the grocery store and parking your car in the back of the lot and walking instead of taking a cab and catching up with friends on a hiking trail instead of a bar stool.”

mehb

This next article is a long read but worth it. It really takes a good look at obesity, from a medical professional’s perspective. Where does personal responsibility fit in while treating it? Is it ok to just give people pills and procedures – enabling them to continue the myth that modern medicine can cure them from their disease? Such a tough subject – from a health standpoint and because society judges harshly those it affects.

FAT CITY-What can stop obesity?

Recently someone told me a story about their daughter in law who has gastric bypass – she lost 100 pounds before the surgery at the doctor’s request, then had the procedure and a year or so later  - is back to many of the same habits and almost has returned to square one. The problem is not what she is eating. The problem is what’s eating her. It’s easy to say that while I am looking at someone else’s situation, but when you are dealing with people who are so deep in denial about what they are dealing with, or who are so scared to address the feelings they are burying deep inside them because it will no doubt cause serious pain – a quick pill or procedure seems like the right way to go. It’s such a tough subject, because I am one of those that people who believe that everyone deserves kindness, but to teach people to embrace their obesity is not Ok either. Everyone deserves respect and decent treatment period but you have to be realistic and sometimes the truth is harsh and painful.  Such a tough, tough situation and topic…

Workout

Strength: Power cleans

WOD
1P wall balls
Clapping Push ups
Broad Jumps
Burpees

Recommended Reading

Kindness Matters

And finally, very sad news over the weekend about Paul Walker dying in a car crash. I can’t honestly say I have seen one of the Fast & Furious movies, but reading about Mr Walker and how he resonated kindness and lived his life from a perspective of giving, it’s a big loss to the world. He was also a father, a son, a friend to many and losing someone that special so sudden and tragically is hard to understand. There has been a lot of backlash on social about the support and acknowledgement of his death which has really surprised me. Who are we to tell someone how they should grieve or recognize the death of someone?  Everyone deals with tragedy and death in their own way and we have no way of knowing what it represents to them.  It sounds like Paul Walker was a stand up guy who didn’t let fame and celebrity get in the way of being kind and giving back. The world needs more people like that. Rest in Peace – Mr Walker.

Paul Walker RIP

 

Allowing Kids to be Sedentary is Asking for Trouble

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Neurological Connections Created During Exercise

As a CrossFit Kids Coach – I am always wanting to learn more about neuroscience related to exercise. It’s so influential in how a child learns and grows that not encouraging kids to exercise is just asking for trouble.

Here’s yet another study:

Exercise is a powerful tool for enhancing mental performance and cognitive health.

Exercise is a powerful tool for enhancing mental performance and cognitive health.Whether you want to improve your memory[1][2], enhance your problem solving abilities[3], reduce your risk of Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s[4][5][6][7], or bend metal and shoot lasers with your mind – exercise has an important role to play in all but two of those activities. In particular, richer exercise regimens – regimens consisting of aerobic and resistance training methods[8][1], produce the greatest overall improvements in cognitive performance. Note, however, working out for sixteen hours each day won’t turn you into the next Stephen Hawking. There are diminishing returns[9], and the favorable cerebral environment promoted by exercise is only as good as the active learning that accompanies it.

 

Childhood Obesity Awareness Month: The Hispanic Community

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I want to start off by sharing with you what I saw on the news this AM: The Donut Burger! I honestly have no words. Do we really think that this what America needs? And for that extra marketing push – let’s aim it at football fans. I am all about personal responsibility but we do all have to be in this together and the people who create shit like this are clearly playing for the other team. I am still shaking my head.

Since I am very interested in education and helping the younger generations get set up for success, I love that many of our CrossFit Impavidus athletes are teachers or work at schools. Mike, a bud of mine from the 6A CrossFit class, is a gym teacher at an elementary school in a local low-income area. 98% of the students at his school qualify for free or reduced lunch. They come from poor, under-educated families and many start life already at a disadvantage.  Tonight is their back to school night and he told me that very few parents will show up. Happens ever year. Many of these students are being raised by their older siblings who are students themselves. The parents work long hours to barely make ends meet. So there is very little parental involvement day to day in their education – which we all know is a key component to students’ success.

We were talking about how this year, he and his co-worker have begun to implement the CrossFit Kids curriculum into their gym program. He mentioned that a large majority of his students are Hispanic and are seriously overweight. Just a quick search of Hispanic obesity rates and its effects served up some alarming statistics from the U.S. Department of Health.  In 2010, Hispanic children were 1.6 times more likely to be overweight than children who are not Hispanic.

We have a serious issue on our hands with all kids and obesity but if you are seeing an entire demographic trending in the wrong direction – that makes it an even bigger problem and one you have to look at not only from the kids’ perspective but from their families as well. 

This month is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. I wrote a blog post for the K12 thinktanK12 blog – where I work, about the seriousness of this issue and the effects it has long term on all of us. A lot of what I wrote about was how parents, along with educators, along with national leaders have to work together to address this issue and if we all do our part, we can force changes. But, think about what I told you earlier in this post, many of the students at the school above are not being raised by their parents on a regular basis.  How do you address the issue the teen sister or brother helping raise their younger siblings and they themselves haven’t learned what living an inactive life with poor nutrition can do long-term?

I don’t have any answers — I wanted to put it out there to help spread the awareness and get people talking about some of the real challenges we all have with influencing change among large groups of people who are barely holding on, trying to make ends meet.

Today’s workout was upper body and it was a hero workout – a way to honor a hero that lost their life while in the line of duty.

warmup
3m of double under practice
DROM

skill
TGU

WOD
Arnie” 

With a single 2 pood kettlebell:

  • 21 Turkish get-ups, Right arm
  • 50 Swings
  • 21 Overhead squats, Left arm
  • 50 Swings
  • 21 Overhead squats, Right arm
  • 50 Swings
  • 21 Turkish get-ups, Left arm

15:18 (did lighter KB – 18-20#)

Los Angeles County Fire Fighter Specialist Arnaldo “Arnie” Quinones, 34, was killed in the line of duty on Sunday, August 30, 2009 during the Station Fire. His emergency response vehicle went over the side of the road and fell 800 feet into a steep canyon during fire suppression activities protecting Camp 16 outside the City of Palmdale, CA. He is survived by his wife Lori and daughter Sophia Grace, born three weeks after his death.

Memories are Limited when we are Unhealthy

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I don’t know if you can see this but if you enlarge it — notice how excited this person was at the great deals she was able to get using coupons! Then notice the crap food she bought — mostly processed food which almost every ‘expert’ – no matter what doctor or diet you are on – tells you to stay away from. Its a great example of what’s wrong with people and why people are so overweight and unhealthy!

There is nothing wrong with this person – she is doing what she knows and most of the country knows this same information of what to eat. It’s BAD information!

And one of my friends posted this the other morning as she waited for her flight — her caption is dead on.

We are getting FATTER and Unhealthier

There is a real problem with our society and their habits. We all know habits are tough to change but this one affects us all! Healthcare costs, family member health, cancer, creating memories with the people we love! All of these are affected by people’s health habits. Think about it —

 

Kids: Obesity & Its Effect on Learning

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childhood obesityI have been doing a lot of research about Childhood Obesity and its effect on learning and have compiled a list of recent articles and research about how lack of exercise and feeding kids crap affect their ability to learn big time. You can’t dispute all of the studies and once you go through them — it should really hit you how important it is for us to instill the healthy and fit foundations that will affect them for the rest of their lives.

 

School Physical Ed Not Helping In The Fight Against Obesity

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No shocker in this info….

 

Physical Education Programs In School Not Enough To Combat Obesity In Most States: Study

Only six states nationwide require the recommended 150 minutes of elementary school-based physical education, according to a study by University of Georgia kinesiology professor Bryan McCullick.

For older students, two states mandate the appropriate amount of physical education instruction for middle school, and none require adequate instruction at the high school level. Guidelines are set by the National Association of Sport and Physical Education.

McCullick’s study examined the role of federal courts in interpreting ambiguous physical education statues.

While public health reforms have emphasized school-based physical education as a means of combatting the childhood obesity epidemic, the study’s results found thatcourts typically do not interfere with state legislative decisions concerning curriculum.

Read more…

Talking Around the Obesity Problem

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Why Doctors And Patients Talk Around Our Growing Waistlines

Many patients say their doctors don’t spend enough time, if any, talking with them about losing weight. But doctors often complain that when they do bring up the issue, nothing changes.

Lisa Flowers says weight is something she wishes her doctor would address more directly. At 47, Flowers stands 5 foot 7 and weighs nearly 300 pounds. She wasn’t always obese. But after she had a baby five years ago and moved from Washington, D.C., to Delaware, she says her workout and eating habits got off track.

Flowers says she’s brought up her weight with her doctor, but the topic is “kind of avoided, almost as if he’s uncomfortable.”

“It’s sort of a beating around the bush kind of thing,” she says.

Her doctor, on the other hand, insists that he and Flowers have discussed her weight and strategies to help her shed pounds. But that’s not clear in Flowers’ medical chart.

What is clear, says Yale University psychologist Rebecca Puhl, is that this kind of disconnect between doctors and patients is all too common. Puhl says just one-third of doctors surveyed say they talk with patients about losing weight. That means two-thirds don’t.

 

Girl Scouts vs. Health and Fitness

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Today is a much needed rest day for me — I’m sore! Not over crazy sore but definitely a good day to rest. What’s crazy is that I miss the gang though — that’s part of the draw about CrossFit. You want to go workout because you miss your pals if you don’t!

So last night, I coached an adult class and I loved it. At the same time, I was able to see my own two kids working out in their CrossFit Kids classes. I am so proud of both my kids and how they are embracing getting fit.  One of my goals for myself for them as they grow up is to really stress the importance of fitness and health. I want to make sure they have a healthy foundation and that it’s a normal thing for them to get exercise in daily in their lives and think about overall health and fitness.

This past weekend, I went to CrossFit for Hope in DC. At the same time 250,000 Girl Scouts hit the National Mall to celebrate the 100 anniversary of Girl Scouts. I love this organization. I have fond memories of being a brownie and my daughter is having a great time learning and experiencing some wonderful things. So what I am about to talk about is not an indictment against the organization as a whole — they do great things and anything that empowers girls to give back and learn about empowerment is all right in my book.

However – one thing that really bothered me this weekend was seeing many of the troop leaders we saw were very overweight. Here they are mentoring young girls, teaching lessons that empower them with little or no regard for 1. their own health and 2. the example they are setting for the girls in their troop. Yeah yeah, I know they are busy and don’t have time to workout. If you have read this blog for a while or know me — you know i call B.S. on that. If you are willing to make it a priority, you can and do have time!!!

I went and did a little research on how fitness and nutrition are incorporated into the Girl Scouts organization. The Girl Scouts of Central and South Jersey have a page about it, but it definitely is not stressed in any of their materials and they leave it up to their troop leaders and whether they want to stress it or not. I also found some info at the Fitness Guru about how they recently entered into a partnership with “the Healthy Weight Commitment Foundation (HWCF) to provide a turnkey customization of three Journey books (the national Girl Scout leadership curriculum) that will offer a focus on health and wellness. This will enable Daisies, Brownies and Juniors to learn how to be leaders who take care of themselves and inspire others to do the same.”

So that’s great but without the backing of the entire organization to make it a priority this means very little. How about investing in specific programs for the troop leaders themselves so that they will truly understand and embrace the importance of health and fitness. This will no doubt set the stage for their daughters and other girls to begin walking the walk and want to learn more about it.

Also about those cookies — I get that they bring in a ton of money for this non-profit organization. We all appreciate the cookies and it’s about personal responsibility and if you don’t want to buy them, don’t. But –they can certainly make healthier options across the board. “No one will buy them” then is the argument — Well, they can’t be crappy and slapped with a healthy label to solve the problem. People will buy great tasting cookies!

And if the Girl Scouts as an organization is truly behind empowering girls and helping them succeed in LIFE, they owe them nothing less than going all in and really backing up their words about overall health and fitness goals. Science and Research is all over the place about how obesity and type 2 Diabetes are huge threats to our kids and it’s not looking like that will be changing soon — so why not do what is truly in the best interest of those you are set up to help?

1. Set up programs that not only focus on the young girls but on the troop leaders as well. This will only help the younger generation they are mentoring and leading.

2. Look into healthier, great tasting cookie options to offer alongside the standards.

3. Rock the Mall — you could have invited some fitness groups to come and get those kids moving as opposed to just sitting on the mall. With music, comes dancing and fitness routines!!

4. Make one of the CORE programs (required) each year – fitness related. Service leadership is really important of course and most troops do a larger effort each year around that. They should be required to do one with their troop leader that is all about fitness and health and gets them moving and learning about how to be healthy and fit! Biggest Loser type program for all troops?

These are just some of the ideas — but come on parents — look at the example you are setting for your kids. Seeing so many of the overweight women leading these kids this past weekend not only saddened and disappointed me, it angered and annoyed me as well. I get it’s work and change to get moving and take care of yourself, but you owe it to yourself and those kids you love to do it!

 

Kids are Getting Fatter!

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Kids are getting fatter, and many will have to do some serious calorie cutting to avoid that fate as they grow up.

That’s the grim news from a new study that looks at how children have become heaver since 1971. It’s not news that the number of obese children has doubled since the 1970s, with 1 in 6 now officially obese.

What’s new is that these researchers calculated just how much less a child would have to eat on average to stop the trend towards obesity.

Let’s do the math.

According to this new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, children and teens need to cut their calorie intake by 41 calories a day, to stop the weight gain trend. Otherwise, children and teens will weigh about four pounds more across the board.

Read more at NPR: Kids Will Have To Cut Serious Calories To Halt Obesity Trend

Get Your Kids Outside and Moving!

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Too Few Kids Getting Outdoors With Mom or Dad

Nearly half of all U.S. preschool-age children don’t get outdoors at least once a day for parent-supervised playtime, researchers reported Monday, causing concern among experts who say early exercise habits could protect children from obesity later in life.

Many children might not be getting enough outdoor exercise because of barriers faced by single parents and families with two working parents, said Dr. Pooja Tandon, a pediatrician with the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children’s Research Institute, who led the research.

The good news, Tandon said, is that “these young children are naturally programmed to be active if given the opportunities.”

Tandon’s study, which appeared online Monday, on the website of the Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine, was based on parental surveys from a national study of nearly 9,000 U.S. children, a sample size representing about 4 million children. The children, all born in 2001, were followed for several years and their parents, usually mothers, were interviewed several times, including the year before their children entered kindergarten.

Along with finding that 49 percent of children were not getting outdoors with a parent at least once every day, she and her colleagues from the research institute and the University of Washington found that those youngsters whose parents took them outdoors to play tended to be boys, children with lots of playmates and those whose parents were exercisers.

Children more often fell short of recommended exercise if their mothers were Asian, African-American or Hispanic, although the study didn’t delve into the reasons. “Being physically active is good for your brain, for your learning,” Tandon said in an interview.

Previous research, she said, has found that hyperactive kids with wandering attention do better after they have had nature breaks, which seem to make it easier to return to class, sit down and refocus.

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